EIPS WCF CD-ROM
 
Menu Items
Start Page · Search
Rome In the News
Answers (Q&A)
Audio Sermons
Photo Gallery
Our Guestbook
Articles
Errors of Rome
Caustic Comments
History Lessons
Rome & Politics
Contemporary
Sword (Bible)
How To Witness
EIPS Lectures
Other Interest



Monday, September 25, 2017
Date Posted:
8/13/1998

Contents
Introduction (1-6)
The Bible (9-23)
The Pope (24-42)
The Sacraments (43-51)
Confirmation (53-54)
Lord's Supper (55-78)
Priesthood (79-94)
Matrimony (95-97)
SIN (98-107)
Forgiveness (108-122)
Indulgences (123-127)
Penance (128-141)
Purgatory (142-159)
Mariolatry (160-187)
Angels (188-208)
Reformation (210-213)
Patrick (214-228)
Ecumenism (229-240)


The Forgiveness Of Sins (108-122)


A Concise Guide to Bible Christianity and Romanism
Dr. Ian R.K. Paisley


  1. If the wages of sin is death is salvation possible?
  2. What did Christ do in order to meet the claims of divine justice and secure salvation?
  3. Was Christ's Work as a Saviour complete, or did it need to be supplemented in any way by the work of man?
  4. Are repentance and faith necessary on the part of the sinner?
  5. What is faith in Jesus Christ?
  6. What is repentance?
  7. How is God's Word made effectual to the salvation of the sinner?
  8. What is the name given to the doctrine according to which the sinner who believes in Christ receives the forgiveness of sins and is accepted in the sight of God?
  9. What is justification?
  10. What does the New Testament teach concerning salvation and good works?
  11. What is the doctrine called which describes the making positively holy the sinner who has believed in Jesus?
  12. What is Rome's doctrine on absolution?
  13. In what way is Rome's teaching objectionable?
  14. How do you understand the text John 20:23: "Whosesoever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whosesoever sins ye retain, they are retained"?
  15. How do you understand the passage in Matthew 18:18 which states: "Whatsoever ye shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatsoever ye shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven"?

Back to Top 108. If the wages of sin is death is salvation possible?

Yes. God has provided a way by which sins may be pardoned and the sinner be saved, that He may be "just and the justifier of him which believeth in Jesus" (Romans 3:26).

Back to Top 109. What did Christ do in order to meet the claims of divine justice and secure salvation?

He assumed man's nature and became subject to the divine law. He rendered perfect obedience to that law and suffered its penalty in the place of His people. Then in token that His Sacrifice was accepted He arose from the dead, ascended up into Heaven, and now ever lives to make intercession for us. "He hath made Him to be sin for us, Who knew no sin, that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him." (II Corinthians 5:21.)

Back to Top 110. Was Christ's Work as a Saviour complete, or did it need to be supplemented in any way by the work of man?

It was complete: no work of man could add to its infinite worth. Christ said on the Cross: "It is finished" and Paul declared: "There is therefore now no condemnation to them which are in Christ Jesus." (John 19:30 and Romans 8:1.)

Back to Top 111. Are repentance and faith necessary on the part of the sinner?

Yes, the command is: "Repent" and "Believe"; but such repentance and faith are not of the nature of works, either preparatory for or contributory to the Perfect Work of Christ.

Back to Top 112. What is faith in Jesus Christ?

Faith in Jesus Christ is a saving grace whereby we receive and rest upon Him alone for salvation as He is offered to us in the Gospel.

Back to Top 113. What is repentance?

Repentance unto life is a saving grace whereby a sinner, out of a true sense of his sin, and apprehension of the mercy of God in Christ, does with grief and hatred of his sin turn from it to God with full purpose of and endeavour after new obedience.

Back to Top 114. How is God's Word made effectual to the salvation of the sinner?

The Spirit of God makes the reading, but especially the preaching of the Word, an effectual means of convincing and converting sinners and of building them up in holiness and comfort through faith unto salvation.

Back to Top 115. What is the name given to the doctrine according to which the sinner who believes in Christ receives the forgiveness of sins and is accepted in the sight of God?

It is called justification by faith, or by grace.

Back to Top 116. What is justification?

Justification is an act of God's free grace, wherein He pardons all our sins and accepts us as righteous in His sight, only for the righteousness of Christ imputed to us and received by faith alone.

Back to Top 117. What does the New Testament teach concerning salvation and good works?

The New Testament teaches that we are saved only by the grace of God, and that good works are an evidence of salvation, not the cause of it. As Martin Luther said: "A good man does good works but the good works do not make him a good man.''

Back to Top 118. What is the doctrine called which describes the making positively holy the sinner who has believed in Jesus?

The doctrine of sanctification. Sanctification is a work of God's free grace whereby we are renewed in the whole man after the image of God, and are enabled more and more to die unto sin and live unto righteousness.

Back to Top 119. What is Rome's doctrine on absolution?

She teaches that the priest pronounces absolution as a judge conveying pardon. "If any one shall say that the sacramental absolution of the priest is not a judicial act but a bare ministerial act of pronouncing and declaring to the person confessing that their sins are forgiven, provided only he believes himself to be absolved. Or if the priest does not seriously absolve him but only in joke or shall say that the confession of the penitent is not required for absolution let him be accursed."

Back to Top 120. In what way is Rome's teaching objectionable?

She teaches that absolution by a priest pardons the guilt and eternal punishment of sin, and that without absolution except in an extraordinary case pardon cannot be had. This puts the work of the soul's salvation firmly in the hand and will of the priest.

Back to Top 121. How do you understand the text John 20:23: "Whosesoever sins ye remit, they are remitted unto them; and whosesoever sins ye retain, they are retained"?

These words can only be understood when one looks at how the apostles understood them, and the apostles understood them in the exercise of the preaching of the Gospel only. Nowhere in Scripture did they forgive any man or woman their sins, but, rather, they preached:

"He that believeth on the Son hath everlasting life" (John 3:36) and

"Neither is there salvation in any other, for there is none other name under heaven, given among men, whereby we must be saved" (Acts 4:12).

"Be it known unto you, therefore, men and brethren, that through this Man is preached unto you the forgiveness of sins, and by Him all that believe are justified from all things from which ye could not be justified by the law of Moses" (Acts 13:38-39).

"And they said, Believe on the Lord Jesus Christ and thou shalt be saved" (Acts 16:31).

The apostles in practice showed that they understood these words to mean that 'whosesoever sins ye are the means of remitting by the preaching of the Gospel, they are remitted unto them; but whosesoever sins your preaching of the Gospel fails as the means to remit, those sins may thus be said to be retained by you, they are retained'. For the Gospel, while it is the savour of life unto life to some, is the savour of death unto death by others. This view is evident, as we have said, from the conduct of the apostles. They forgave sins by preaching and not by saying: "I absolve thee.''

Back to Top 122. How do you understand the passage in Matthew 18:18 which states: "Whatsoever ye shall bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatsoever ye shall loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven"?

This refers to the power which was committed to the apostles as founders of the Christian church to release from the obligations of the Mosaic law, and to bind upon the people whatsoever was necessary. It is a power which did not descend beyond the apostles. Even if it had descended it would have pertained equally to all churches.

Back to Top

http://www.ianpaisley.org
Email: eips_info@yahoo.co.uk
Return to EIPS Main Menu


Menu Items
- Start Page · Search - Rome In the News - Answers (Q&A) - Audio Sermons - Photo Gallery - Our Guestbook 
- Errors of Rome - Caustic Comments - History Lessons - Rome & Politics - Contemporary - Sword (Bible) 
- How To Witness - EIPS Lectures 
Site best viewed with Microsoft Internet Explorer 5.0 in 800x600 resolution.
© 1999 Ian Paisley. All rights reserved.